Fuel Subsidy Removal Triggers School Schedule Changes in Edo, Nigeria

Edo State Reduces School Days to 3 per Week due to Fuel Subsidy Removal:

Learn more about the decision made by the Edo state government to reduce school days for public basic and junior secondary schools in response to the federal government’s subsidy removal.

Find out the details and implications of this change, including the plan to maximize e-learning and ensure curriculum coverage.

In a surprising turn of events, public basic and junior secondary schools in Edo state, Nigeria have had their school days trimmed down to three per week.

This drastic measure, announced by Mrs Ozavize Salami, the chairman of the Edo State Universal Basic Education Board (SUBEB), has been enforced due to the federal government’s removal of fuel subsidy.

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Impact of Fuel Subsidy Removal

The impact of fuel subsidy removal is far-reaching, causing a ripple effect that extends beyond the borders of energy and finance.

This impact is now palpably felt in the educational sector, as reflected in the altered school schedules.

Schools to Operate on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays

Students in Edo state will now be limited to attending school only on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

The state government, facing the realities of the fuel subsidy removal, deemed this necessary as a strategic adaptation to the prevailing economic conditions.

A Focus on Maximizing E-Learning

We aim to optimize e-learning during this period to ensure comprehensive curriculum coverage for our students,” stated Mrs. Salami.

Thus, despite the reduction in physical school days, efforts are being made to ensure educational continuity via e-learning.

Public and Civil Servants to Work Three Days a Week

Public and civil servants will also be affected by this policy, with workers required to be in the office only thrice a week.

Those not on duty will work remotely.

A Six-Week Period Before Vacation

The new schedule will span six weeks before vacation, and during this period, schools will focus on achieving the necessary curriculum.

The school days will also be extended by one hour for basic schools and two hours for junior secondary schools to compensate for the loss of physical school days.

Rescheduling Due to Administrative Reasons

Administrative considerations prompted the selection of the first three days of the week for schooling.

The remaining two weekdays will be incorporated into the three school days, ensuring that students still get a comprehensive educational experience.

Fuel Subsidy Removal: A Widespread Impact

It’s clear that the removal of fuel subsidies has caused more than just fuel price hikes.

It’s affected public services, including education, demonstrating how economic policy decisions can have widespread and sometimes unexpected effects on society.

In conclusion, the ripple effect of fuel subsidy removal in Nigeria continues to spread, reshaping various aspects of society.

Edo State’s response, reducing school days to three and increasing emphasis on e-learning, is a striking testament to this.

The situation serves as a vivid reminder of the interconnectedness of economic policies and societal welfare.

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FAQs

Why were school days in Edo State reduced to three a week?

The reduction was a response to the federal government’s removal of fuel subsidies, which has significantly impacted economic conditions.

When did this new schedule start?

The new schedule commenced on Tuesday, June 13.

What days will schools be open?

Schools will now be open only on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

What is the state’s plan for ensuring educational continuity?

The state plans to maximize e-learning to ensure students cover the necessary curriculum despite the reduced physical school days.

How will the working hours of public and civil servants be affected?

Public and civil servants will work in office thrice a week and operate remotely when not on duty.


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